Saturday, January 20, 2007

Milk Noodle Soup

Sounds pretty gross, right? This is a traditional German-Russian recipe passed down through mom's family. I wouldn't eat it growing up, but eventually it became a true comfort food. When I'm cold, lonely, or sad, this soup fixes me. I wish I had a good recipe for it, but you don't really make it by measuring or thinking... stuff goes in, soup comes out.

  • Extra wide egg noodles. The cheap kind. About two handfuls, a bowl-full.
  • Milk. I use 1%, but skim or other milks work. Enough to cover the noodles in your bowl.
  • Butter. A teaspoon will do fine, and this is not optional.
  • Salt and Pepper. Put it in, just a little... the pepper really helps.


Microwave safe dish: add noodles and milk. Cover with paper towel. Cook on high four minutes. Rest in microwave two or three, then alternate a minute on and off until the noodles are soft. Don't let the milk boil over: this is the worst mess you can imagine, plus it makes the milk wonky in your soup. Stir often. Caution: microwaving things makes them hot. If you didn't figure that out, you probably shouldn't be using the microwave. Oh, and do not substitute the butter with margarine. Margarine makes yellow blobs on the milk, and that just isn't tasty at all.

Grandma and Grandpa make this on the stove, but one risks scalding the milk. I prefer the microwave version anyway. Mmmmm, Milk Noodle Soup!

23 comments:

Jean Vitrano said...

This is so interesting. There isn't really a recipe for this soup that I have found until I just came across your post. My dad, German, used to eat this regularly and growing up in a Catholic household in the 60's this was frequently a Friday dish, as at that time Fridays were meatless. This really brought back memories...thought I'd slip in a couple of years later and tell you I just ran across this...

gabriela marková said...

Hi, I am Czech and my granmother would prepare milk soup for me when
I was a child. She cooked it scarcely and when I grew up I didnt had it for long years. She would use very thin noodles, so called soup or hair noodles, and the soup was prepared very fast. The older I get the more I enjouy really simple recipes as this one.

Anonymous said...

I just wanted to thank you for actually having a reciepe for this soup. My husband's mother (who was german) apparently made this for him whenever he was sick growing up. She has been gone for the better part of 20 years now and he rarely mentions anything about her... but he just came home from an outpatient surgery and has been asking for his moms milk noodle soup. I had no idea what he was talking about so I googled and found this. Thank you so much, I now have a husband that is sleeping like a baby and I can now relax too.

Regal Red said...

WOW! Talk about memories of my childhood! My German grandmother often made milk and noodles although I don't think she called it "soup." Many times I have tried to make it the way my grandmother did and I have come close but something is still missing!!! I found that if I cook the noodles (elbow macaroni, egg noodles, rigatoni -- whatever I have in the cupboard) first and then add the milk it comes out closer to her recipe. Add just enough milk to cover the noodles and then zap it in the microwave on the reheat cycle. She added garlic powder, salt, pepper and butter. I like the blends of the herbs and spices in vegetable seasoning. Hmm...today is overcast and rain is predicted! I think I will make some noodles and milk! :-)

Anonymous said...

Wow! I was just telling my husband about a milk noodle soup that my mother use to make when we were kids, so I googled it & this is the only website that had the info. My great grandparents were Germans who immigrated from Russia to America. Until I read your post I had no idea that the recipe mom made was an old German-Russian recipe. Oh, & my mom use to use Allspice instead of pepper, but I think both ways would be great. Thanks so much for posting this. You just brought back a piece of my childhood.

Anonymous said...

Mmm I love milk noodle soup.
My grandmas is the best.. she makes it similar to how you mentioned but also throws in bay leaves and all spice...
which kind of gives it a knoephla soup taste...

Jean said...

I grew up on noodles & milk. It's still 1 of our family favorites! We always made homemade egg noodles, boiled them, then added them to a pot of warm milk that had pieces of kielbasa sausage in it. And seasoned it with a season salt.

Anonymous said...

As I am boiling water for my milk noodle soup I thought I would Google it to see if anyone else ever ate this. When ever we mention it people look at us like we are from another planet! My Great Grand parents came from Germany. My Grandma and Mom both made it every christmas eve and one of the days before easter, like a tradition, So I've kept it up and my kids love it and my wife has gotten used to it.
I cook it on the stove and use almost a whole package of egg noodles(medium),cooked until soft then add enough milk to cover, add 2 to 3 tablespoons of butter, and salt and pepper to taste. I bring the milk to a boilthen turn it down to low and let it simmer until its creamy. I'm 48 years old and I can't ever remember missing a christmas eve with out my milk noodle soup. My wife said she likes the tradition thing more than the soup, but at leastshe tries. Great to find your site and to know that we're not from another planet.

Ginnie said...

Thank you for the recipe for the milk noodle soup. I thought I must be crazy for remembering such a thing from childhood so I am glad I am not crazy. I actually remember eating this as a child and I think I actually liked it and there wasn't a lot I liked back then. I can't wait to try it again. Thanks again.
Ginnie
Eugene, OR

Amy @ Raising Arrows said...

I realize this is a very old post, but I had to comment anyway! My mom was sitting here tonight telling me about "kilka soup" (I'm sure I didn't spell that right) that her family ate when she was a child and how she dearly loved it. She said they just dropped bits of noodle dough into the soup, but your recipe is the closest I could come doing a google search for this allusive soup. I'm very anxious to try this with my own children! Thanks!

Anonymous said...

My mother is Russian, and raised 5 children here in America. Milk Noodle Soup was a weekly food for us because it was cheap and filling, and the kids gobbled it up. She stopped making it as we grew older since we didn't need the calories. But I just decided to Google it, since I always thought it was something she made up. Nice to see the recipe is as simple as she always said. Sometimes she would add a dash of sugar just to sweeten the flavor. As soon as the weather turns cold, I'm making this old favorite for myself! Thanks for posting this old favorite!

Anonymous said...

My Grandma made this often when I was a child. She was of German-Prussian descent, and it was one of many "old world" dishes she made. I recently made it for the first time and shared it with my own children. When I tasted it, it was like she was right beside me. It tastes the way she always made me feel...warm and comforting. My kids and my husband love it! A new generation meets an old tradition.

Sandy from Texas said...

I have been eating and making milk noodle soup my entire life. My German grandmother made it for my mother and her siblings as they were children to help them sleep. My mother continued the tradition with me and my brothers. To this day I still make it for myself when I need to be comforted. I have never asked my child or partners to eat it, and none of them have asked to try it. I thought that I was the end of the milk noodle soup tradition and also thought I was the only one in the world who ate it. Last night my boyfriend googled it as I was making it and found this post on the internet about it. I was so excited to see that other people eat and love milk noodle soup!! I personally cook the noodles in the milk at a very low temperature till the noodles are cooked. I find the flavor is better cooking it that way. The only thing I add is salt and pepper... lots of salt!! Eating a bowl right now and got a warm fuzzy from eating it!!

Whitby said...

I lived in Russia for a couple of years teaching English, and my host mom would make this soup all the time! I've hunted all over for a recipe that tastes like the soup she made, even in Russian recipe books, and this is the best I've found! Thank you for posting this!!!

Anonymous said...

my dad always made me milk noodle soup from when i was little. i have cand ontinued making it through the years. i lost my father when i was 14;and it soothes me and comforts me on the days i miss him the most.

Anonymous said...

My German great grandmother and aunts used to make "noodles and milk" when I was a child by boiling fresh egg noodles,adding them to heated evaporated milk and adding a bit of butter, salt and pepper. I thought it was just in my family.

Anonymous said...

Great food..

Heat whole milk with a spoon of butter, a little salt and pepper. Pepper is the key.. Bring milk to a boil slowley watching ever second. It is a mess when it boils over. Add dry noodles or the homemade type and continue to watch and stir.. Yummy...

Mike Padilla said...

My Grandfathers family were Germans from Russia (Volga Germans). They made a version that was whole milk butter salt pepper and home made dumplings. Occasionally he would add smoked German bratwurst cut into chunks. So simple but so comforting on a winter night.

Anonymous said...

This is great. I had exactly noodles and milk to cook tomorrow that was not meat (tomorrow is a Lenten Friday) so this recipe sure came in handy!

Anonymous said...

My father called this OLD MAN'S SOUP. I'm going to make some for lunch. Yummy.

Anonymous said...

My grandmother called it Noodles and milk. We make it a little different.
Start the noodle water to boil.
When you add the noodles to the water, start to heat 1/2 stick of butter, salt & pepper, in large cast iron frying pan. Hot heat until butter is brown and just starts to burn. Add whole milk slowly while stirring. Bring to almost boil. Noodles should be done. Drain noodles, and add noodles to milk. Bring back to almost boil, reduce heat. Add 1/2 cup cream and simmer another 2 or 3 minutes.
I am going to try cooking the noodles in the milk next time, instead of water and try the allspice.

scott wathen said...

I love this soup soo much, I grew up eating this soo often, my mom would make noodles from scratch on the kitchen table, you all should try making the noodles from scratch and letting them slowly fall into the pot, omg

Ronald Ulrich said...

I can't thank you all enough for posting your recipes and memories. They prompted me to form a Google Group for more sharing. Germans-from-Russia@googlegroups.com Join in if your like.